Cobb County DUI Drugs Lawyer

Drug DUIs have similar penalties to that of an alcohol-related DUI. However, if officers discover the presence of drugs while arresting you for DUI, you could also be subject to drug possession charges, making your case much more serious.

If you have been charged with driving while under the influence of drugs, call an experienced attorney at Hawkins Spizman today. A Cobb County DUI drug lawyer could help build your case by gathering evidence, advocating on your behalf when negotiating with police officers and prosecutors, and provide you with professional representation in court. Call today to learn more.

When Would Someone Be Charged with DUI Drugs?

A person can be charged with driving under the influence of drugs just like alcohol. They are driving a car, they get pulled over for a traffic violation, and then during the investigation, the police officer suspects that they have a drug in their system that is impairing their ability to operate a motor vehicle. The prosecutor will have to prove not only that the drug was in their system, but that it impaired their ability to operate a motor vehicle.

Any substance that can impair a person’s ability to operate a motor vehicle can lead to a drug DUI. Individuals can be arrested for driving under the influence of several types of drugs such as opiates, marijuana, cocaine, and legally prescribed drugs. Just because the drug is legal, that does not mean it cannot impair one’s ability to drive. On many occasions, they can find themselves taking a drug legally that could still impair their ability to operate a motor vehicle.

How Common are DUI Drug Charges in Cobb County?

The prevalence of drugs in everyday life has increased over the last several decades. This could be attributable to the fallout of over-prescribed opiates. These are very common drugs which can leave its users with a heavy feeling of sedation. Due to their addictive nature, some users may develop a dependency, leading to addiction. As a result, people under the influence of their drug may try to go about their day, which includes getting behind the wheel of a car. The effect of these drugs is also enhanced when mixed with alcohol.

In addition to opiates, there are more casual marijuana users than there once was. Marijuana is a drug that is easily accessible by the public and is not as villainized as it once was in the past. However, in the eyes of the law, marijuana is still illegal in Georgia and individuals in possession of this drug can still be penalized. As a result, a person driving under the influence of this drug could also be charged with a DUI offense.

How Different are Alcohol-Related DUIs in Comparison to Drug DUIs?

DUI drug charges are very different from alcohol-related DUIs in a number of ways. For example, alcohol is a much more familiar impairing substance which most people understand. Sometimes with drug DUI cases, it is difficult to detect whether someone is under the influence of a drug. Officers are trained to use their sense of smell to detect anything suspicious, but with drug DUI cases, a person’s sense of smell may not be enough to detect the use of many drugs.

With alcohol cases, there is a legal limit for blood alcohol content in a person’s body. However, for drug DUI cases, there is no legal limit. As a result, it could become much harder to test for drugs, especially since traces of certain drugs can stay in a person’s body for an extended period, sometimes up to a month. This makes it difficult to prove that someone was driving under the influence of drugs since the accused may have used drugs days prior to their arrest, but were not under the influence during the arrest.

Call an Attorney for Help

If you have been arrested for a drug-related DUI offense, get in touch with a professional attorney as soon as possible. A Cobb County drug DUI lawyer could take the time to speak with you about the circumstances of your arrest and help you build a convincing argument that could lessen the severity of the penalties, or have your charges reduced, or possibly dropped altogether. To learn more, get in touch with one of our attorneys at Hawkins Spizman today.